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How to find your 3D printing application fit: 10 criteria to consider

Adopting innovative technologies for your business can be both challenging and exciting. The tremendous benefits sound promising and tempt us to get started without setting clear expectations. This article is a guideline for organizations who want to integrate additive manufacturing into their established production processes. Not every 3D printing technology is equally suitable for every situation. This is why we’ve created a list of 10 criteria to help you explore where AM offers the greatest technological and economical value for your application, prior to making any decisions.

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AURA.CONNECT: A sneak peek at our new fleet management software

It’s a common problem: Even if you’re away from your printer you still want to track the status of your print job and understand what’s going on. And the more printers you have, the more difficult it becomes to monitor each of them. Ideally, you want to log-in to a system to ensure an optimum utilisation of all your machines.

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Anisoprint launches Clear PETG and CFC PETG for continuous fiber 3D printing

Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg – March 15, 2022: Anisoprint, a continuous fiber 3D printing systems and software OEM, is introducing Clear PETG and CFC PETG, a second pair of filaments for desktop Anisoprinting. Developed for use with Composer A4 and A3, PETG is one of the most universal and effective materials for composite fiber co-extrusion (CFC). The material is paired with a proprietary profile in Aura slicer library, which guarantees high standard quality and exactly predictable properties.

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Carbon Fiber 3D Printing: chopped and continuous fibers reinforcement

In additive manufacturing, there are two main ways to use carbon fiber for 3D printing: printing with continuous fiber and chopped fiber. The resulting parts are very different in properties. The added fiber serves as a booster for plastics enhancing their parameters by certain values. Both types of reinforcement have their own characteristics, application areas, and technologies associated with them. We will describe composite materials, the types of carbon fiber reinforcement, the required equipment developed for these materials available on the market, and the applications.

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What should I know before I start to develop my own slicer?

What skill set is required to develop a slicing software for 3D printing? Our Head of Development Natalia Sabinina explains the essentials that you can immediately put into practice to create your own slicer.

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Composite 3D Printing 101

Composite 3D printing is a relatively new trend in additive manufacturing. It is an innovative technology that allows creating 3D printed parts with enhanced parameters of strength, stiffness, and durability due to fiber component added to plastics.

There are two ways to add fiber to plastics: fill with chopped fiber or reinforce with continuous strands,  here we describe continuous fiber reinforcement specifically, as chopped fibre does not contribute to the properties equally and does not add to the quality and strength as much.

As part of the overview (101 stands for novice course), we will study the benefits of composites compared to both plastics and metals, look inside the existing composite 3D printing technologies, investigate the nowadays market and dwell on Anisoprinting.

Continuous carbon fiber reinforcement enhances mechanical properties of printed parts unlocking a wide range of applications in aerospace, automotive, aviation, and medical industries, and we will make a special case on it.

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Automated Fiber Placement

AFP, automated fiber placement or initially “advanced fiber placement”, is one of the modern and popular technologies of composites manufacturing. In essence, it is an additive manufacturing process fully adapted to high productivity: it uses carbon fiber tapes instead of filament to increase the coverage, works on open areas, and creates complex surfaces like fuselages, oil pipes, or spaceship parts.

The key feature of this technology is speed and automation. In contrast with hand lay-up, automated fiber placement allows significantly increased deposition rates.

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Real 3D printing: how to produce non-planar continuous fiber reinforced composites

Most 3D printing processes are actually 2.5D. What does it mean? The conventional process of 3D printing is laying material on top of each other on the parallel plane, resulting in a three-dimensional object.

In traditional 3D printers, moving parts are most often either the printing table, or the printing head, or both of them, such as in the Composer — continuous fiber 3D printer. Even though the table and the print head move along the x, y, z axes, the layers are still stacking in the parallel plane, and each subsequent layer is parallel to the previous one.